Blurb Appreciation Reviews: The Ayah and Other Stories

Welcome to the first Blurb Appreication Review:

Confused about what it is?
Click here before reading on!

The Blurb:

About The Blurb:

The above blurb says it all and I feel that I have nothing much to add about the setting and themes of the stories.

But I would like to focus your attention to the picture at the bottom of the back cover. Looks scary, right?

Well it is meant to be.

Sri Lanka, according to many myths, was supposed to have been ruled by rakshashas or demons. The picture you see at the bottom is the Naga Rakshasa mask (Snake Demon mask) which is worn during rituals or performances to exorcise the demons or the rakshasas. Notice the many snakes on the top of the mask!

Now that is what I call a kick ass blurb-it not only tells you what the book is about but entices you with a bonus picture too that lets you know more about the setting!

For more information on the rakshash masks: click here and here!

Continue reading

Musically Yours: After Dark

I am slowly starting to read some Murakami. The first book of his that I read was Strange Library which was indeed strange and had such a beautiful cover featuring a library card!

Next I read Desire, part of the Vintage Mini Series, which had five of his short stories. I absolutely adored that book! Read my review here!

Next up was After Dark, which one of my colleagues gave me as well. I did not mind reading it since she said it was only 200 pages long. (I am going through a phase where I somehow cannot commit to books that are too long because I do not get time to read them!)

Continue reading

Musically Yours!

The Book Cafe is proud to present a new series that will highlight the books that have a musical element in them!

The books could be about music, or have protagonists that love music or have some great music references or some other elements that make the book/story connected to some form of music!

Welcome to Musically Yours!

How can you contribute?

  • Read:
    Take a look at all the entries in this category!
  • Spread the music: Share and spread the word!
  • Guest Posts:
    Oh we love guest posts! Perhaps you know about books that are related to music? We would love to hear from you!
    Share your thoughts with akisabookworm@gmail.com

 

Guest Post: Reading Indian Language Translations!

In July, The Book Cafe had stated an interesting idea about how one needs to read books from all the states in India-be it in the original language or translated. Click the link here to see the full list of books The Book Cafe has read from different Indian States!

Meera Baindur, a bookworm and philosophy faculty at Bengaluru Central University, shares her own thoughts about reading translations of different Indian languages. 

Read On!

Guest Post: A Guide to Making Money off Thrift Store Bookshops!

For many the idea of being able to profit from something that they truly love is not a reality.  It instead is a dream, often thought to be an unrealistic dream at that.  People who dream this dream often do not have the tools to turn it into a reality.  This post will outline how to turn a passion for books and shopping into profit in 5 simple steps!  I, personally, have followed the steps below and now boast a profit of over 1k monthly from reselling books I find at thrift stores.

By reading this post you, too, will gain the skills to begin making money on books you find at the thrift store!

Continue reading

Pardesi: The Big Banana

Honduras!

What do I know about the country?
Next to nothing!

Which is why I lapped up onto the suggestion when a colleague mentioned about how she has books by a Honduran author.

The Big Banana by Roberto Quesado has a protagonist named Eduardo Lin, who comes to New York City to become an actor along with a parallel story of Mirian, in Honduras, who has a Cold War spy obsession which culminates in her obsession with the character of James Bond.

While in New York, Eduardo lives in a rented house along with other immigrants who each have their own stories and reasons for being there. Back in Honduras, Mirian’s obsession goes out of control and she regularly visits a psychiatrist, who takes Eduardo’s helps to fix this obsession when he had been in Honduras. With this, Mirian and Eduardo, becomes long distant lovers.

And that brings me to the opening scene of The Big Banana where Eduardo is busy cursing the New York Telephone that regularly sends him huge bills to pay.

Intrigued? Read more!

Pardesi Series!

Immigration may be a buzz word in recent times worldwide. But it is an act that has been going on throughout the world through times immemorial; and that it is used as a political tool to create disharmony is detestable. This is because for one it diminishes the humanity of the issue and then it erodes the idea that sometimes it maybe forced and beyond an individual’s control. Hence, at times, politics is what leads to immigration and yet politics is also deterring it and creating this false sense of danger around it.

To keep politics aside, immigration has several repercussions for the person as well as the place to which the person immigrated to. It could be in terms of language, the food, the issue of assimilation and acculturation; or feeling ostracised, and even feelings of extreme loneliness among many others. It could help a place to know more about different cultures, its food and language and other aspects as well.

To commemorate this loss and gain, The Book Cafe is going to start a series called, Pardesi, which will highlight books that talk about immigrant experiences.

Pardesi in Hindi means “someone who has gone outside of their country to live.”

Pardes in Hindi would mean “a foreign place.”

How can you contribute?

  1. Read and Share:
    Find the link for all the posts in this series here!
  2. If you would want to talk about or do a guest post on any novel or story or poem or play that have immigration as a theme, let us know! Contact: akisabookworm@gmail.com
  3. Or if guest posts are not your thing, you could simply give recommendations for books you thought best captured the immigration experience.

 

When We Were Orphans

Typical of Kazuo Ishiguro’s themes, When We Were Orphans, which is set mostly in the 1930s England while also hovering over to Shanghai, deals with the diminishing of one’s memories and the protagonist, Christopher Banks, makes a conscious attempt to try and recollect them and tell his story.

Through these recollections we see how he lived in Shanghai and how he had to come back home to England due to his parents going missing.

Continue reading

Travel Diaries!

The Book Cafe is launching a brand new series titled, Travel Diaries!

Does that mean we are doing on adventurous sojourns?

Only the bookish kinds!

We all know how through books we can vicariously travel, am I right?

So this series aims to showcase those books that take you to places that you have never been to perhaps; to see places from the eyes of different travelers be they teenagers, students, backpackers, expats or through historical accounts!

Here is the link to the all the posts categorised in this section!

Welcome aboard!

Guest Post: Purple Hibiscus

About the Reviewer:

Linda Shaji-Pauline is a feminist with a love for post-colonial literature. When she’s not at work, her motto is, “will walk for food.” You can often find her walking around all over the city in search of that new restaurant. She is still undecided if she loves music or books more but agrees that together they make the best combination. Together they make her life in finance very tolerable.

I first read Purple Hibiscus during my undergraduate studies as part of a reading list. This was the first time we were introduced to English literature from the African continent. With the deadline arriving for a book report, I desperately tried searching for a cheap book out of the list that was available in the local bookstore. I figured that I would use the remaining change for a snack or so, not realising that this would turn out to be one of my favourite reads! I believe I’ve read it four times at least.

So with such a biased stance, I believe I’m all set to review Purple Hibiscus yet again.

Adichie has mentioned before that she’s been influenced by one of Nigeria’s greatest post-colonial authors – Chinua Achebe. This strikes the reader the minute we read the first line, “Things started to fall apart……”

So what is the novel about?

Continue reading

The Top 5: Translation titles

Come September and we are to celebrate the world of translations!

That is because September is the National Translation Month!

#NTM!

Take a look at this below to find more translation picks!

https://nationaltranslationmonth.org

Here are my Top 5 translations! There are of course many more but these are the ones I picked for this post!

Continue reading

Musically Yours: Chicken With Plums

Read Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi?

How about picking up another of her equally insightful and somberly black and white illustrated graphic novel, called, Chicken with Plums?

The musician Nasser Ali Khan’s favourite tar (an Iranian percussion instrument) is broken. He probably had the best one in the world. Now that it is broken, he goes on a search for an equally matched tar. But after failing to find such a one despite his repeated attempts, he consigns himself to a state where he simply only wishes to die.

The protagonist being a renowned musician having deep questions about his art and his life makes this novel part of The Book Cafe’s series called, Musically Yours!

Continue reading

Vintage Minis: Desire by Murakami

Vintage Minis is a series launched in 2017 by Penguin that is characterised by its brevity and universal themes of what makes us human.

Desire is the theme the publishing house chose for Haruki Murakami’s five short stories that are taken from three of his following short story collections:

  • Elephant Vanishes
  • Blind Willows, Sleeping Women
  • Men Without Women

While I did not really go looking for the theme of desire in each short story, I did enjoy all five of them since each had its own unique tale to tell.

Starting with The Second Bakery Attack that is narrated as an anecdote of the past of how a newly married couple found itself gnawed by a hunger that they had never known before and which they could only satisfy through a curious robbery!

Continue reading

Quick Reviews: The Plague

Albert Camus is well known for his Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays, through which he pioneered the idea of the absurd and made a relatively lesser known Greek mythic figure, Sisyphus, into a worldwide celebrity for the absurd task.

Even in his classic 1947 novel, The Plague or La Peste (in French), he uses the motifs of absurdism predominantly.

Continue reading

Red Sorghum

The opening of Mo Yan’s Red Sorghum – a child of fifteen setting out to join his foster father’s mission to ambush the Japanese – sets the tone for the rest of the novel: not only violent but intensely detailed violence.

Within that violence is embedded the story of three generations of a Chinese family that lived before and through the Second Sino-Japanese War, the Cultural Revolution up to the 1970s.
The part which is most emphasised on is the first one: the life of the family before and through the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Keep on Reading!