The Reading Spree: Poetry

May has come in slowly and steadily and brought in its wake extended lock down of two more weeks.

I hope May is not as slow as April. Why must time be relative? Why does it feel so?

April is celebrated as the National Poetry Month by Academy of of American Poets to celebrate American poets.

So I decided to read only poetry this month.

Poems have a lovely, magical quality to them of saying so much, in so less. They convey emotions in so many myriad ways that it is breathtaking!

These are the collection of poems I had at home and I decided to read them in the month of April.

Along with poems I also reread Camus’ The Plague and boy oh boy it was an intense experience and reading it felt like I was looking at a mirror at our own world today that has been hit by the corona virus pandemic.

Read my thoughts about The Plague and the book’s similarity with today’s world on The Curious Reader. 

But apart from this novel, all my reading was poems. These are the five poetry collections I read this month:

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Quick Reviews: The Plague

Albert Camus is well known for his Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays, through which he pioneered the idea of the absurd and made a relatively lesser known Greek mythic figure, Sisyphus, into a worldwide celebrity for the absurd task.

Even in his classic 1947 novel, The Plague or La Peste (in French), he uses the motifs of absurdism predominantly.

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The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

Albert Camus, the celebrated French writer and pioneer of the absurd thought, began The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays with this dramatic opening:

“There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide.”

Cheerful, right?

Well it may not be, but it immediately forces you to contemplate on the meaning of life as that opening lingers on in your mind.

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