The Top 5: Indian Stories that Merge Folklore and Fiction!

Folklore are the world’s oldest stories. India is replete with them. All corners of the country can boast of their own set of different oral stories that have been passed down from one generation to another.

Yet the 20th and 21st century (and perhaps earlier too?) there have been authors who have created exceptional fictional worlds, after being inspired by folklore and legends. They rewrite them. They create their own. They interweave fiction and folklore creating a rich tapestry of story telling, adding to our country’s own storytelling traditions.

Here’s our Top 5:

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Poesie: The Bees

If you have not yet fallen in love with Carol Ann Duffy’s poetry, you must pick up her latest collection, The Bees (2011).

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Divided into four sections and encompassing various themes that are held together by the one of the tiniest yet the most important creature of the planet: bees.

Interspersed between odes to the vitality and importance of the bees and the gardens they enable to bloom, are myriad poems ranging from feminist to ecological themes to the ones that comment on current political scenarios that dominate the West.

The ecological poems are beautifully portrayed through the use of the bees metaphor. The use of the bees metaphor is definitely something that is not an oft used idea, particularly to talk about the ultimate devastation that our planet is heading towards; yet it is one of the many creatures that is threatened and which also threatens our existence in return.

Though all the poems that center around bees are heady and evocative of lush blooms and bouquets of flowery beauty, my favourite is Scheherazade. It is about the need to speak, the necessity to speak out rather than die. It is a lovely take on a well known fairy tale trope of Scheherazade from the Arabian Nights, weaving tales to stay alive; each story narrated taking her one step away from death.

Sarcasm is also a tone prominent in many of her other subversive poems such as The Female Husband which portrays a different side of gender or the immensely witty, Mrs Schofield’s GCSE which takes a dig at the way we assess the learning of literature.
Read the poem here.

Romantic strands are subtly woven into a few other poems. These poems’ obviously hidden romantic veneer comes as a surprise at the end. Case in point is Rings. Take a guess what it is about.

And true to her well known style, many of the poems in the collection are devoted to the questioning and presenting of issues through use of larger mythological characters such as Achilles or Leda.

While it is easy to simply say that The Bees is about saving the bees and introspecting about the environmental damage, the poems will actually take you on a roller coaster ride of varied themes with its ups and downs of subversion, sarcasm and stark beauty.

It is akin to entering a beehive itself: well organised but so vast that one can get lost. But only when one is lost though, that one can come out enriched and truly know why Carol Ann Duffy poignantly says, “Honey is art.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Maharaja’s Household

The Maharaja’s Household: A Daughter’s Memories of her Father is a unique memoir told from a daughter’s perspective. This non fictional account is about Maharaja Churachand, the erstwhile ruler of the current Indian state of Manipur, told from the perspective of his youngest daughter, Princess Wangol or as she is more widely known, Binodini. It is an informal account, based on her own memories of how she saw her father and also based on stories she heard from people that surrounded the Maharaja.

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Binodini is a humble narrator who admits that the book is not a historical account. The key word to remember is also memoir. She admits often that some stories might not even be accurate and that they are based on stories she has heard from other sources or from her own memories. Continue reading

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Their Eyes Were Watching God‘ by Zora Neale Hurston is undoubtedly her best known novel. Published in 1937, it is a singular story of a black woman protagonist, Janie Crawford and the significant changes in her life. To write a women centric novel in that era is an achievement worth being entitled to.

The novel starts with Janie returning to her second husband’s town, Eatonville, after having runaway with Tea Cake, a man who was younger to her. The townspeople start gossiping and advise Pheoby  Watson, Janie’s close friend, to find out what has happened to Janie. Then Janie begins telling her story to Pheoby: Janie was married at the age of 16 to Logan Killicks by her grandmother, Nanny, so that Janie could have the security of a home . However, Janie never fell in love with him and ran away with another fellow named Joe Starks. Joe was an ambitious man who made Janie move to a new town called Eatonville where he did all he could to make the town prominent. He brought land, opened a store there and became the mayor. He ordered Janie to take care of the store but Janie was quite unhappy with that job. After Joe’s death, Janie fell head over heels in love with Tea Cake who was younger to her. They both loved each another immensely and moved to the Everglades in Florida. After Tea Cake’s death, Janie returned to Eatonville.

The story goes in good flow. The most positive aspect of the book is Janie’s strong willed characterization. She is not portrayed as a damsel in distress but rather as an intelligent, well minded personality. It is a feminist book that highlights a woman’s thoughts, ideas and feelings as well as emotions and problems. Another plus point of  ‘Their Eyes Were Watching God‘ is the usage of a dialect. Zora Hurston has not used the language which you and I use but the dialect in which the southern blacks spoke. This lends to authenticity to the story(However some readers who are not able to read the dialect may find the story irritating and incomprehensible).

Nonetheless, ‘Their Eyes Were Watching God’ is an excellent book, and provides insightful perspective.